The Lit Pub’s 4 Book Bundle of Awesome!!

4 book bundle of awesom copyFor a limited time, get my collection, TOGETHER WE CAN BURY IT, Aimee Bender’s THE THIRD ELEVATOR, Liz Scheid’s THE SHAPE OF BLUE, Lena Bertone’s LETTERS TO THE DEVIL for just $40 from The Lit Pub bookstore: https://lnkd.in/bhXH2Mw

Proud to be a part of this! The Mile-High MFA is now open for business!

storytellers wanted

YOU WANT TO TELL STORIES. YOU WANT TO WRITE POEMS. BUT YOU CAN’T FIND THE TIME.
NOW IS THE TIME.

Apply to Regis’ Mile High MFA, a low-residency program that lets you stay at your job and close to your family, but pushes you to make time for writing. You’ll leave the program with a manuscript ready to submit to publishers, along with an action plan for putting your writing into practice in the world.

I’m very honored and excited to join the faculty of this program, co-directed by David Hicks and Marty McGovern, teaching flash fiction, beginning January, 2016! Sherman Alexie is coming to the Regis University campus on Tuesday, March 10th to launch the program. Denver area folks register HERE! And Click here for more info about the Mile High Low Residency MFA in Creative Writing.

Some thanks and three of my micros/prose poems up at Fictionaut

Last night’s reading at the Mercury Cafe went really well! Huge thanks to uber talented Katharyn Grant, who hosted the evening and who also very generously read a couple of my stories and did them more justice than I ever would. Thanks also to Sally Reno, who read a fantastic story of her own before giving the kindest introduction, ever. The F-Bomb series that Nancy Stohlman curates is a fun, interesting, flash fiction only event and I was glad to be a part of it. So thanks also to Nancy for the invitation! I think I read better than usual last night, so maybe with practice I’ll come to really enjoy giving readings. Anything can happen!

I want to talk a little here about the intersect between microfiction and prose poetry. How do we tell them apart? Is it even necessary to distinguish them? For myself, prose poetry is more imagistic, metaphoric, and well, poetic. It doesn’t require the arc that flash fiction does (and some would argue even flash fiction doesn’t require an arc, but I would say, it should at least give the sense of an arc, if that makes any sense). Prose poetry, to me, is pure sound and image and language and rhythm and flow. I like to write it. I like to get out of pure storytelling mode sometimes, though I don’t consider myself a poet at all.

So! I’ve started participating at Fictionaut again and I’m having a lot of fun. Just throwing up whatever strikes me to get new readers to the work and also reading all the fantastic stories and poems on there. Jane Hammons is posting her work again and do go and find her, she’s a genius.

Anyway, here is a link to three prose poems/micros that appear in my Matter Press chapbook, WILD LIFE. They are…strange, be warned:

Three Micros.

Upcoming reading at the Mercury Cafe, Denver

I’m the featured reader for January in the long-standing monthly event, The F-Bomb Flash Fiction Reading Series, curated by the amazing Nancy Stohlman. The multi-talented Katharyn Grant will hosting (and kindly performing some of my pieces), with introduction and reading by terrific writer Sally Reno. There will be an open mike as well for other readers to participate! Details below:

The F-Bomb Flash Fiction Reading Series

Great review of TOGETHER WE CAN BURY IT at Book Riot

Wow. Huge thanks to David Abrams (author of the novel, Fobbit), for this beautiful review of my collection for the Riot Round-Up. I’m so happy and honored by this praise from a writer I admire so much:

I’ll keep this short: After reading Together We Can Bury It, I’m convinced there are few living authors who are better at flash fiction than Kathy Fish. She packs an incredible array of life, in all its rich complexities, into each one of the 40 stories in this 2012 collection. Unlike many short-shorts, Fish’s fiction doesn’t lean too heavily on allegory or turn characters into symbols and it rarely (if ever) leaves the reader scratching her head in “WTF?!” befuddlement. These are beautiful slices of life–little gems that, at every turn, left me feeling like I was filled with sunlight. — David Abrams

Here’s a link to the whole article, listing some fabulous books: Riot Round-Up: The Best Books We Read in December. The book may be ordered directly from The Lit Pub.

My Favorite Reads of 2014

As usual, my favorite reads were published predominantly by small presses, written by writers unafraid of taking chances with their work:

I bookended the year with collections by the innovative Robert Vaughan: Diptychs + Triptychs + Lipsticks + Dipshits (blurbed, reviewed on Goodreads) and Addicts & Basements, also reviewed on Goodreads.

Every Kiss a War by Leesa Cross-Smith, just a beautiful collection, I blurbed and reviewed on Goodreads and interviewed Leesa here on this blog!

I also read and blurbed Nancy Stohlman’s book Vixen Scream and Other Bible Stories. Nancy is another original who performs her stories live as well as she writes them.

I read Avital Gad-Cykman’s chapbook recently released from Matter Press: Life In, Life Out, and reviewed it on Goodreads and interviewed Avital right here on this blog.

If I Would Leave Myself Behind: Stories by Lauren Becker, which I also talked about here.

Understories by Tim Horvath, which is terrific and I gave five stars to on Goodreads.

I read two Gay Degani books in 2014, her collection, Pomegranate Stories and her novel What Came Before, which I blurbed and reviewed on Goodreads. I also interviewed Gay right here and she has lots of smart things to say about writing in general.

Bald New World by Peter Tieryas, reviewed on Goodreads. This book was recently nominated for the Folio Prize in the UK.

Bones of an Inland Sea by Mary Akers, reviewed on Goodreads.

The Last Days of California by Mary Miller, reviewed on Goodreads.

An Untamed State by Roxane Gay, reviewed on Goodreads.

My Mother Was An Upright Piano by the talented and versatile writer of flash as well as longer works, Tania Hershman, reviewed on Goodreads.

Girl with Ears & Demon with Limp by Edward J. Rathke, reviewed on Goodreads.

Doll Palace by Sara Lippmann, this book was one of my favorite short story collections of 2014 and one of my favorites, ever…reviewed at The Lit Pub.

Still Writing: The Perils and Pleasures of a Creative Life by Dani Shapiro, a great inspiration in 2014 and mentioned in various posts on this blog.

I reread The Remains of the Day by Kazuo Ishiguro (who incidentally drafted the novel in four weeks according to this article in The Guardian).

Understudies by Ravi Mangla, reviewed on Goodreads.

House of Mirth by Edith Wharton

Where’d You Go, Bernadette? by Maria Semple

Don’t Tease the Elephants by Jen Knox. blurbed and reviewed on Goodreads.

Quarry Light by Claudia Smith Chen, reviewed at The Lit Pub.

The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the American Dust Bowl by Timothy Egan. A fascinating, harrowing read.

The Creative Habit: Learn It and Use It For Life by Twyla Tharp, another inspiring read, also mentioned a time or two on this very blog.

Smokelong Quarterly: The Best of the First Ten Years 2003-2013, a book I contributed to and reviewed on Goodreads.

Dept. of Speculation by Jenny Offill, reviewed on Goodreads. I loved this book so much I read it twice.